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Re: Fogging of windows

Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 11:44 am
by NightPHEVer
This is odd - my 2014 GX4h has no condensation problems at all. It's been variously parked in a garage and outside over the last 3 years. As previously mentioned by karl, the only time I've ever had a problem with this is when a heater element (a small radiator located usually under the dashboard in an especially inaccessible position) leaks (or possibly a heater hose connection). Smells of burning anti-freeze when it gets hot and seriously steams up the windows when in use and when the car is left overnight.

If you put your hand up the plastic pipe where the heat comes out to the floor it'll usually be wet, sometimes to the point where it drips onto the floor. My PHEV's not done this (thank god) but I had a Jeep Cherokee that did it twice, and a Citroen Xantia. On both occasions the burning anti-freeze smell was evident, leaking coolant on the floor and a lot of condensation on the windows. Mostly the front windscreen though. My neighbour had it happen on a new Land Rover Discovery.

Re: Fogging of windows

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 5:18 am
by ThudnBlundr
Tipper wrote:I find it best to leave the aircon on...all the time...and on fresh air inlet not recirc.

Whilst I understand the expectations of economy when driving a PHEV and the non-use of aircon for these reasons, I never turned it off on my other recent cars with diesel and petrol engines so why do so now? My comfort and safety takes far more importance than a few watts of power!
Like you, I keep it on all the time, but it's not just for comfort. Refrigerant also contains lubricant to keep the seals functioning properly. If you don't use the AC regularly, the seals can deteriorate and cause leaks.

Re: Fogging of windows

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 6:24 am
by Regulo
NightPHEVer wrote: . . . (a small radiator located usually under the dashboard in an especially inaccessible position) . . .
You're not kidding! When mine went in a Volvo, I swear they started building the car from that radiator outwards. Horrendous job to get to it, and in the end I decided to leave it to the professionals to deal with, taking a considerable hit to my wallet.

Re: Fogging of windows

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:57 am
by NightPHEVer
The time it took me to replace the heater matrix in my 1998 Jeep was measured in days rather than hours. Most of the front interior had to come out, air bags deactivated, steering wheel removed and entire dashboard. Then the poxy heater matrix/raditor/heat exchanger/element - what ever you wish to call it, could be found contained inside a plastic box with lots of little plastic 'doors' that opened and closed via the medium of vacuum from the inlet manifold, to allow the air to go where you want it. I'm quite sure cars have been written off due to the cost and difficulty of replacing a heater matrix. I expect the PHEV system is of a similar design but maybe the little plastic 'doors' are operated by electricity rather than vacuum.

I seem to remember the matrix in my 1963 MGB was inside the bonnet attached to the bulkhead, and very simple and cheap to replace. I once actually made a heater for my Series 2 Land Rover which utilised a margarine pot to divert the incoming air into seperate air tubes.

Re: Fogging of windows

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:14 am
by Kesto
Most modern cars are getting more and more complex. I had top spec citroen will all options. Which is a non luxury car but had everything from mood lighting electric brakes, electric gearbox semi automatic and so. After 5 yrs problems started with electronics . In the end the cost or repair was more than the car in thousands. All the money went down drain. Since then I have been taking 3 year PCP.

Re: Fogging of windows

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:45 am
by ThudnBlundr
Ours went in an old smoker of a Citroen CX Estate. It took me over a day to extract it from the bowels of the dashboard, and they wanted more than I paid for the car for a replacement. So I went to a Scrappy and managed to extract one in 1½ hours, as I wasn't so bothered about putting it back together again neatly ;) In the end, it failed its MOT a few months later, and I sold it to a friend in the Royal Engineers. He took it to a demolition range and used it as a target for explosives training :shock:

Re: Fogging of windows

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:48 am
by NightPHEVer
The matrix I replaced in my 1998 Jeep was actually almost identical in appearance to the matrix in my 1963 MGB. A small radiator with two pipes sticking out of it. I expect the PHEV heater matrix has a very similar apperance. You'd have thought after 50 years of basically the same item performing the same task, that by now they would either be better quality or easier to get to.

So, raiders or kesto - any further indication as to the reason for the 'fogging-up'? As far as I know, based on my own experience, there has to be a source of moisture for condensation to form inside car windows, either leaking heater matrix or a leak of rain water from outside. The leaking heater matrix is not especially hard to work out though as however small the leak, the smell when it gets hot is usually obvious.

Re: Fogging of windows

Posted: Thu Dec 03, 2020 5:13 pm
by manich004
Hi, I have Mitsubishi outlander 2016 phev and its fogging like rain inside i spent a lot of to different mechanics i thought probably something is leaking and water getting inside but nobody can find any leakage.

2nd problem with right front light keep burning evey 2 month. Inside like is very little fog any idea