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Re: Fuel filter change

Posted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 3:29 pm
by jaapv
AFAIK the glass bowl on the fuel pump was all the filter there was. At least, it is on my TR4. Reason that little plastic filters were available to fit in the fuel line. Not that those SUs and Strombergs were very sensitive to dirt, it simply blows through. The problems started with fuel injection...

Re: Fuel filter change

Posted: Thu Jun 11, 2020 4:49 am
by richr
My Renault 5s (various models, 1.1, 1.7 and a couple of GT Turbos mainly) had the plastic filters in the engine bay before the cam driven fuel pump, apart from the GT Turbos which have electric pumps and metal cannister filters inconveniently located under the car in front of the fuel tank. And one of my GT Turbos was low enough that knocking the filter off on a speed bump was a very realistic possibility :)

Obviously on diesel cars the fuel filter is something you change regularly, and it's usually located prominently in the engine bay. My 1991 Mitsubishi Pajero had a heated fuel filter to prevent problems with fuel thickening at temperatures below -20C. Not that I really needed that much in the UK!

Re: Fuel filter change

Posted: Fri Jun 12, 2020 12:30 am
by greendwarf
Aah! so having a fuel filter was for those over sensitive foreign types, whereas a "real man's" British car (like jaapv's TR) was tough enough to cope with a bit of dirt :lol:

I drove mostly Dagenham Dustbins - so no problem there :roll:

Re: Fuel filter change

Posted: Thu Jun 18, 2020 1:53 am
by Kesto
Not a technical person , but don't you get fuel cleaner additives? Or use one full tank of Shell super fuel which contain additives to clean?

Re: Fuel filter change

Posted: Thu Jun 18, 2020 3:40 am
by richr
Whilst it's true that petrol contains detergents and de-watering agents, the filters are designed to capture small bits of dirt (or on older cars with metal tanks and filler pipes, rust). For example if you fill up with petrol near the coast you're inevitably going to get the odd grain of sand in. Sand and bits of grit are insoluble so there's no additive that could get rid of them, but a physical filter (usually a woven felt type material) will collect them.