Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Forum

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 Post subject: 2019 Outlander PHEV reviews and what we know
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 4:31 pm 
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"We have improved about 90% of the main components of the PHEV system (in regards to MY2019)" - notable quote, Yoji Otani, Chief Product Specialist, Mitsubishi | Note: this does not apply to AUS, USA, & CAN

Changes to MY2019 are much more extensive than what the March 2018 press release revealed. The updates need to hold over this model for at least a few more years, until the Nissan-based all-new 2nd gen model ( https://www.motor1.com/news/241921/2021 ... ssan-rogue ), which is expected to potentially double its current electric range ( https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/indu ... evelopment ). Unfortunately, there is a forked version of MY2019: one with all the updates that the majority of markets will get, and another that gets the body updates, but not the powertrain updates, and this is what USA, Canada, and Australia will get. Please feel free to add or correct this information, text in bold is what may be significant, and text in blue shows the latest information, information subject to change.

*Press Releases (PR)*
There are two official Press Releases for the 2019 Outlander PHEV - one in March 2018 during the Geneva Auto show debut that was light on details, one in June 2018 with more details, and now an official page that describes the changes with pictures and video:

*Production Reviews*
Here are the first production model reviews from Ireland, UK, France, Germany (who takes the phev for some mild off-roading), Netherlands, and Spain:
Reviews of the forked version - new skin, old powertrain, from Australia:

*Pre-Production Reviews*
There are a few pre-production model reviews in Japan, and using Google translator, one can find details in here not found anywhere else, such as the specific steering ratio changes, catalytic converter changes to quiet the exhaust sound, larger suspension struts (not just larger shock absorbers), etc:

Here are the reviews based on a pre-production model in France:

*Availability*

*Powertrain* | Note: this does not apply to AUS, USA, & CAN
    - "new" 4B12 MIVEC (the previous 2.0L ICE was named 4B11) 2.4L ICE engine produces 135hp and 211 nm/torque, up from 121hp and 190 nm/torque, respectively. It automatically switches between Otto (high load) and Atkinson cycle (low load) (Mitsu 06/18 PR)
    - front electric motor "S61" produces 60 kW (80 hp), rear electric motor "Y61" produces 70 kW (94 hp) (Mitsu 06/18 PR | Car Watch jp)
    - 0-100kph (or 0-62mph) has improved from 11.0 to 10.5 sec for models that get the powertrain update (Mitsu 06/18 PR)
    - top speed on battery-drive has increased from 125kph/78mph to 135kph/84mph for models that get the powertrain update (Mitsu 06/18 PR)
    - battery-drive WLTP range is 45 km/28 miles (Mitsu 06/18 PR)
    - battery-drive supplier remains GS Yuasa ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubish ... -in_hybrid ), a Mitsubishi subsidiary. Unfortunately, GS Yuasa is not known for high quality and technology: http://www.plugincars.com/mitsubishi-pl ... 27429.html
    -- if you're curious about the GS Yuasa battery recall in Japan, and pictures of Mitsubishi removing the battery pack: https://car.watch.impress.co.jp/docs/news/607870.html
    - battery-drive life expectancy (reasonable effectiveness): 8 years if "carefully used", according to Toshinaga Kato, Mitsubishi ASEAN vice president. ( https://www.bangkokpost.com/auto/news/1 ... i-ev-drive ) What does it mean "carefully used"? Possibly this: https://www.evolutionaustralia.com.au/t ... ur-battery
    - battery-drive capacity increased from 12kWh to 13.8kWh (Mitsu 06/18 PR)
    - 4 hours to charge using UK AC 230V 16A outlet with the larger battery, up 30 minutes versus the smaller battery (Mitsu 06/18 PR)
    - transmission is a fixed-gear built by GKN, it is not a CVT as some sources claim (Car). A key element of the transmission is the hydraulic clutch system which has the ability to connect/disconnect the ICE to the front wheels (tib.eu), although Wired UK criticized its un-refinement. GKN calls it their "Multimode eTransmission": https://www.tib.eu/en/search/id/tema%3A ... Mitsubishi | Update: GKN has removed the case study link, which prominently featured the Outlander. This indicates Mitsubishi, now under Nissan's control, has discontinued its GKN partnership with the all-new Outlander due around 2021/22. Chances are that Mitsubishi will use Nissan's eTransmission supplier Aichi Machine Industry: http://www.aichikikai.co.jp/en

*Exterior* (about half of the exterior changes are standard across all trims, whereas the other half is only visible on higher trim levels)
    - new LED headlight design, before the LED headlights were only for the main beam, and halogen projectors for the high beam. Now there is LED for both the main and high beams, although it is unknown whether the main LED beam has functionally improved. LED headlight is only available on higher trim, halogen projector headlights for the lower trim seem unchanged
    - new LED fog lights with silver rectangle fog light bezels, emitting blue (high temperature) color, only available on higher trims and exclusive to the PHEV version. Round yellow-color fog lights (not sure if these are LED or halogens) are coupled to either a black plastic surround or a chrome lined surround, seems unchanged from before, available on lower PHEV trims and various non-PHEV trims. Various markets also offers round blue-color led fog lights without the silver rectangle bezels
    - revised front fascia, the two main horizontal grill lines run together, black shadow chrome standard across all PHEV trims and available on select non-PHEV trims. Silver plastic accent trim added to the lower valance and is standard across all trims. "Mitsubishi claims the updated front and rear bumper designs reduce wind noise, while the rear spoiler ... enhances aerodynamics." - https://www.caradvice.com.au/672697/201 ... ing-specs/
    - revised rear lower bumper design, this is standard across all trims. Unfortunately, the rear reflectors were not replaced with integrated exhaust outlets, which would have helped modernize the look further
    - new 30-spoke silver painted 18" wheel design replacing the 8-spoke black and machined block design. This is standard across all trims and exclusive to the PHEV version. It seems most export models have the all-silver wheels, however some JDM and high-end trims do come with a two-tone gunmetal (dark gray) and silver wheels of the same design, first seen on the pre-production models. Even more rare, some markets and trims have this design in full gunmetal, as can be seen in this version from Netherlands: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiTsjpoYQCw
    - new large rear spoiler design is different than the accessory-add-on one for some reason. The newer version has a slight indent in the center section and available only on higher trims. The accessory-add-on rear spoiler does not have this slight indent

*Functional*
    - larger shock absorbers and suspension struts. Piston diameter of shock absorbers increased from 32 mm front and 30 mm rear, to 35 mm front and 32 mm rear. (Mitsu 06/18 PR | Car Watch jp). The S-edition (not available in all markets) will retain its exclusive Bilstein struts/shocks, implying that it still represents an upgrade over the already upgraded MY2019 struts/shocks ( http://www.mitsubishi-motors.co.jp/line ... mance.html )
    - "new" structural adhesive welding, increasing body rigidity (Mitsu 06/18 PR). It is likely these are the same adhesive welding introduced in the JDM MY2017 "S" model mentioned here, they concentrate on the rear subframe sections where flex is most apparent: http://www.mitsubishi-motors.co.jp/line ... nt_06.html
    - revised steering ratio (from 18.2 to 15.8) and remapped power steering ECU (Mitsu 06/18 PR)
    - larger front and rear disc brakes: before 11.6 inches/295mm ventilated front (2 pot) and 11.9 inches/302mm solid rear, now 12.6 inches/320mm ventilated front (2 pot) and 12.6 inches solid rear. Strangely Mitsubishi's press release did not mention the larger rear discs, and the disc size for some reason is like a closely guarded secret, no official Mitsubishi site shows it except Mitsubishi Spain for MY2019 and Mitsubishi USA for MY2018. For comparison, a 2019 Toyota Highlander with almost identical weight has 12.9 inches/328mm front and 12.2 inches/310mm rear (https://www.mitsubishi-motors.es/outlan ... enchufable) | Note: this does not apply to AUS, USA, & CAN
    - revised traction control system (Mitsu 06/18 PR)
    - new Sport and Snow modes (in addition to the existing Save, Charge, and EV modes) | Note: this does not apply to AUS, USA, & CAN
    - additional soundproofing for quieter interior (dinside). Consequently, overall kerb weight has risen from 1860kg to 1880kg, much of it likely due to soundproofing, which tends to be dense materials
    - tires upgraded from Toyo brand to Yokohama (Car), with the exception of JDM (Japanese Domestic Market), which still uses Toyo. Tire size remains 225/55 R18
    - illuminated auto up/down and anti-pinch controls for all windows, not sure if this is the "revised switchgear" being referred to in some articles (Mitsubishi NL)
    - new rear seat hvac vents located in center armrest console, along with one usb port for rear passengers
    - it appears the electric sunroof has been removed from all phev trims in the UK market, possibly to keep it under a certain price point for tax reasons
    - instrument display of the power meter has been updated, so that the operating status and output of the engine can be seen at a glance
    - updated front seats (but still no memory function), they don't look the same as the upgraded front seats from the JDM MY2017 "S" model, although both look more bolstered than the previous standard seats. Diamond (or quilted) pattern texture seems exclusive to the PHEV version and only on higher trims. It also seems the rear seat center folding armrest has been redesigned and fixed to fold flush (dinside picture), the issue was reported and seen in various reviews where the center folding armrest would slightly jut out
    - for Europe only, new 5H and 5Hs trims, adding Alpine sound system, Nappa leather, rear heated seats, and interior LED mood lighting: https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/mitsubish ... -5hs-trims

*Accessories*

*Other*
    - final assembly location remains exclusively at Okazaki, Japan for the PHEV version. Parts contents is expected to remain 96% Japan, with the remaining 4% unknown (based on sample USA MY2018 window sticker)
    - the flip side to an old platform from MY2013 is that reliability increases during the platform's life, and according to Consumer Reports (USA) survey data, as early as 2015 the Outlander was rated as "really reliable" (regular Outlander reviewed), it's probably better now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOEqvanhbYI
    - this is in harmony with a 2019 Whatcar reliability survey, ranking the Outlander PHEV in the top 3 among electric vehicles: https://www.whatcar.com/news/best-and-w ... ity/n17069
    - that being said, there are still quite a few recent TSB's from 2017 and 2018 found here: https://www.truedelta.com/Mitsubishi-Ou ... s-220,2018 (change url year to adjust year) Technical Service Bulletins, or TSB's, are optional fixes the dealer can apply at their discretion and only when a customer complains about a specific issue. Design fixes are usually applied some time later to address various TSB's, but not guaranteed
    - IIHS (USA) MY2018 crash tests have been posted, most likely the results will be similar if not identical to MY2019: https://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/vehic ... r-suv/2018 Small overlap, the most difficult frontal crash test, is rated Good and earns the Top Safety Pick label, validating Mitsubishi's RISE (Reinforced Impact Safety Evolution) safety cage design ( http://www.mitsubishi-motors.co.jp/line ... afety.html ), and the roof's strength-to-weight ratio rated at 4.96, which is Good. However, IIHS also rated the halogen projector headlights as Poor, and the LED headlights as Average. It does not look like MY2019 has upgraded the halogen projectors, and it is unknown whether there are functional improvements to the primary beam in the updated LED headlight
    - detailed walk-around of the JDM version (Japanese Domestic Market), notice this one has the two-tone gunmetal and silver spoke wheels, most export models have the all-silver version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIYT9ZVkf9g
    - UK promotional video showing Outlander PHEV... drifting! (because, why not?) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-t6lmr4zyW4

*Competitors (SUV, PHEV, AWD, similar price)*
    - Citroen C5 Aircross (https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/lifesty ... d-size-suv)
    -- 37 miles/60 km all-electric range

    - Ford Kuga/Escape (https://www.autoblog.com/2018/05/30/202 ... -in-hybrid)

    - Hyundai Sante Fe (https://insideevs.com/hyundai-santa-fe- ... rid-coming)

    - Jeep Renegade (https://www.greencarreports.com/news/11 ... d-in-italy)

    - Kia Niro
    -- AutoExpress head-to-head: https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/105798/ki ... v-pictures

    - Mini Cooper S E All4 (https://www.miniusa.com/model/hybrid/co ... ryman.html)
      -- 12 miles/19 km all-electric range from 7.6 kWh battery, mechanical AWD, starting price $36,900 (USA), availability now
      --

    - Subaru Crosstrek (https://insideevs.com/subaru-crosstrek- ... he-numbers)
      -- 17 miles/27 km all-electric range from 8.8 kWh battery (sourced from Toyota Prius Prime), mechanical AWD, starting price $34,995 (USA), availability 12/2018 (USA)
      -- advantages: mechanical AWD is more capable off-road (versus Outlander's electric rear motor), especially in diagonal incline or deep loose sand. Drive battery is located in the trunk, providing more ground clearance. Unconventional boxer engine allows for lower center of gravity and consequently improved handling dynamics
      -- disadvantages: mechanical AWD also means less driving efficiency, since the mechanical driveshaft is always connected. Drive battery in the trunk also means rear interior storage is almost halved compared to Outlander, and the drive battery itself is smaller, meaning less all-electric range. Boxer engine fundamentally fights against gravity, leading to potential long-term engine wear, especially the piston gaskets (Subaru and Porsche are the only manufacturers still using this configuration in volume). Subaru is one of the few manufacturers whose interior material quality can be worse than Mitsubishi. Warranty is noticeably lower than the Outlander in the USA, each country may vary
      -- verdict: winner Outlander PHEV. Although sporting a newer chassis and better handling and off-road capabilities, the shoe-horn of the Prius Prime's electric drive results in too many compromises for the Subaru, especially an impractically small trunk (similar issue to Ford's Fusion/Mondeo plug-in). The drive battery really needed to be larger than the Prime due to the increased weight, and a near identical starting price to the Outlander makes it a tough value proposition, along with its lower warranty

    - VW Atlas Cross (https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/ ... ross-sport | near-production model seen here: http://www.carglancer.com/2020-volkswag ... e-in-china)
    -- currently configured with 26 mile/42 km all-electric range (from 18 kWh battery): http://newsroom.vw.com/vehicles/vw-atla ... las-family

    - SUV, PHEV, AWD, but not in the same price range:
      -- BMW X5 xDrive40e
      -- Mercedes GLE
      -- Mercedes GLC
      -- Porsche Cayenne E-hybrid
      -- Range Rover Evoque
      -- Range Rover P400e
      -- Volvo XC60
      -- Volvo XC90

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Last edited by Woodman411 on Sat Mar 02, 2019 8:52 am, edited 383 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 4:45 pm 
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I already got a sales brochure in the mail last week, which answered some of these questions. Unfortunately I tipped it into the waste paper basket virtually unread.

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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 4:20 pm 
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It seems like this article verifies somewhat that the USA/Canada versions will be only the partial updates without the powertrain updates: https://www.automotive-fleet.com/304007 ... -in-hybrid

:( :cry: :( :cry:

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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:32 am 
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Here is the first side-by-side I could find between the 2018 and 2019 models:

Attachment:
Screen Shot 2018-06-10 at 7.17.31 PM.png


Some observations from this side-by-side shot:
- LED lights have three small and light vertical slits (looks like three v's from the side), the headlight cover shape remains the same. It is not clear if the non-LED headlights have changed or will remain a lower-trim option, or whether all trims will standardize on LED (in the USA market, only the GT trim has the LED headlights)
- the two horizontal grill lines that incorporate the diamond-star logo are wider and closer together, the diamond-star itself seems unchanged in size and color
- the lower front air dam is slightly wider and now incorporates silver-colored vertical slits
- the fog light housing has rectangular silver accents
- license-plate bracket location is lower, now partially covering up the lower air dam versus being on top of it (this might be preproduction only)

Based on the above, it will be interesting to see if some, if not most of these frontal 2019 changes, can be easily retrofitted to the 2018 model. On a personal level, I think the horizontal grill and LED headlight designs are a definite improvement, the rest I'm not sure about.

Moving on to the rear, not as much changes as the front:

Attachment:
Screen Shot 2018-06-10 at 5.58.27 PM.jpg


Some observations here:
- it is not clear if the larger rear spoiler will be standard across all trims (in the USA market, it is an optional accessory)
- the chrome trim on the 2019 looks consistently darker than the 2018, but this could be just lighting differences
- lower rear air dam is now mostly painted silver, versus the 50/50 split with black plastic, and incorporates four underbumper ridges


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Last edited by Woodman411 on Sun Jun 10, 2018 5:52 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:17 pm 
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Latest dinside article has verified a few things: https://www.dinside.no/motor/kan-ga-tre ... m/69873122
- still no memory seats :(
- ICE 2.4L engine produces 135hp and 211 nm/torque, up from 121hp and 190 nm/torque
- the road test notes lower road noise and improved driving dynamics, suggesting more changes than the press release has revealed, including revised suspension, steering, brakes, and additional soundproofing
- the rear center armrest in the picture is completely flush when not in use, suggesting there has been some slight rear-seat redesign besides the diamond seat pattern. We can also clearly see the new rear hvac vents in this shot

Attachment:
Screen Shot 2018-06-10 at 7.23.47 PM.png


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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 12:45 am 
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Autoexpress (UK) review:
http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/mitsubishi ... ift-review

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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 2:30 am 
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If it becomes available in time later in the year I would try one, but it doesn't sound hopeful, the soundproofing and ride IMHO need a lot more than a tweak.

The steering apparently has been improved but have they done enough? whilst the feel and precision of the steering is really good in my opinion but something is not right, maybe the weighting? at motorway speed faults in the road surface cause the car to lose direction too easily so it requires quite a lot of frequent correction, its relative for sure, but certainly compared to some other cars I have owned, it makes it a more tiring long distance drive than it needs to be.

The styling get more modern each revision but uglier in my opinion. I wonder if the paint is any better now?

I just can't see me trying the new one and falling in love again like I did in 2015, but who knows? my head still tells me its the most sensible car, 4wd, lowest tax and the 2.4L is in the next band so automatically would increase the company reimbursement I get considerably, I would make a profit per mile! - we will see!

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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 3:23 pm 
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BobEngineer wrote:
If it becomes available in time later in the year I would try one, but it doesn't sound hopeful, the soundproofing and ride IMHO need a lot more than a tweak.

The steering apparently has been improved but have they done enough? whilst the feel and precision of the steering is really good in my opinion but something is not right, maybe the weighting? at motorway speed faults in the road surface cause the car to lose direction too easily so it requires quite a lot of frequent correction, its relative for sure, but certainly compared to some other cars I have owned, it makes it a more tiring long distance drive than it needs to be.

The styling get more modern each revision but uglier in my opinion. I wonder if the paint is any better now?

I just can't see me trying the new one and falling in love again like I did in 2015, but who knows? my head still tells me its the most sensible car, 4wd, lowest tax and the 2.4L is in the next band so automatically would increase the company reimbursement I get considerably, I would make a profit per mile! - we will see!


We know the 2019 changes will not upgrade the vehicle in any significant way until it rides on a new platform, which at this point is a given that it will be shared with something (maybe Rogue platform) from Nissan. The fact that they updated even the chassis tells me that the current Outlander will need to hold over for at least a few more years, and if the Outlander feels old now, by 2020 how much more so. The only reason why I'm not getting the new 2019 Toyota RAV4 hybrid versus the 2019 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is the generous tax credits available at the federal and state levels in the USA. Yes the Mitsubishi has plug-in ability, but that can go only so far, as the 2019 RAV4 undoubtedly will be superior in every other way.

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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 3:08 am 
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BobEngineer wrote:
If it becomes available in time later in the year I would try one, but it doesn't sound hopeful, the soundproofing and ride IMHO need a lot more than a tweak.

The steering apparently has been improved but have they done enough? whilst the feel and precision of the steering is really good in my opinion but something is not right, maybe the weighting? at motorway speed faults in the road surface cause the car to lose direction too easily so it requires quite a lot of frequent correction, its relative for sure, but certainly compared to some other cars I have owned, it makes it a more tiring long distance drive than it needs to be.

The styling get more modern each revision but uglier in my opinion. I wonder if the paint is any better now?

I just can't see me trying the new one and falling in love again like I did in 2015, but who knows? my head still tells me its the most sensible car, 4wd, lowest tax and the 2.4L is in the next band so automatically would increase the company reimbursement I get considerably, I would make a profit per mile! - we will see!
Bob, I think the problem you describe may not be caused by the steering, but by the rather second-rate tyres the car comes on. Mine has run on A-brand tyres from the beginning and has never exhibited such behaviour. In fact, it feels completely stable up to its max speed. Otherwise, what about the wheel alignment? Some PHEVs have been known to be delivered with the the caster all over the place.

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 Post subject: Re: 2019 Outlander PHEV, what we know, what we don't
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:32 am 
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jaapv wrote:
BobEngineer wrote:
If it becomes available in time later in the year I would try one, but it doesn't sound hopeful, the soundproofing and ride IMHO need a lot more than a tweak.

The steering apparently has been improved but have they done enough? whilst the feel and precision of the steering is really good in my opinion but something is not right, maybe the weighting? at motorway speed faults in the road surface cause the car to lose direction too easily so it requires quite a lot of frequent correction, its relative for sure, but certainly compared to some other cars I have owned, it makes it a more tiring long distance drive than it needs to be.

The styling get more modern each revision but uglier in my opinion. I wonder if the paint is any better now?

I just can't see me trying the new one and falling in love again like I did in 2015, but who knows? my head still tells me its the most sensible car, 4wd, lowest tax and the 2.4L is in the next band so automatically would increase the company reimbursement I get considerably, I would make a profit per mile! - we will see!
Bob, I think the problem you describe may not be caused by the steering, but by the rather second-rate tyres the car comes on. Mine has run on A-brand tyres from the beginning and has never exhibited such behaviour. In fact, it feels completely stable up to its max speed. Otherwise, what about the wheel alignment? Some PHEVs have been known to be delivered with the the caster all over the place.


I have had the alignment out and adjusted over the years, its very clear on the PHEV when its out, its terrible! but even when perfect I find the car has issues, comparatively to some other cars. Tyres maybe a part of the issue but I suspect a major part is the horrific state of UK roads, poor condition, poor quality, poor repairs - our cars need quite a bit of steering weight at speed to help resist the road influence.

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