2024 Outlander PHEV - Engine runs to burn old fuel.

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Yup, the temp on the dash display is the exterior temp. I don't know where the sensor(s) is, but I find that they are pretty accurate. In the old days one could get a little, coin sized temp display which could be stuck on the dash to show the interior temp, but I've not seen one for years ... and I would like one.
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/364474976171

Maybe a bit big.
 
Not at all.

In the 2018-2022 this was not the case. In those years the ICE would be forced to take presidence only if the Drive Battery was depleted, Outside Temp was below a certain value, at times, when the HVAC was used and when the driver requested more power than the EV Motors could supply.
Strange; I own a MY19 PHEV and as I am retired, do between 75% to 90% of my trips on pure EV.
If I do only drive local trips, therefore 100% EV, I do get this warning to refuel at least 15 liters (or 20 liters?)
So it seams MM is consistent with this choice with the MY24 models.
 
There'll be no inconsistencies in the vehicles, the programming will be entirely consistent and it's all computer controlled. Any apparent inconsistency will come from human error - the owners.
 
In the old days one could get a little, coin sized temp display
Maybe this would work or this (which probably isn't available any more) or this (if you are prepared to do surgery). You might find the same sort of thing on Banggood, Temu or AliExpress. But if not, you can always do mailorder from Australian. :)
 
Yup, the temp on the dash display is the exterior temp. I don't know where the sensor(s) is, but I find that they are pretty accurate. In the old days one could get a little, coin sized temp display which could be stuck on the dash to show the interior temp, but I've not seen one for years ... and I would like one.
Lots of choices for stick on temp gauges of varying sizes on Amazon.
Motorcycle (waterproof) Temp Gauges are most likely the Analog style you are familiar with.
Similar style digital are used with Fish Tanks and Terrariums, as are Stick on Color Changing Strips (either vertical or horizontal).
 
No point getting an interior temperature sensor, it has no bearing on anything other than the climate control (which, funnily enough, already has one). Get in the 21st century.
 
You feel hot - turn down the aircon setting.
You feel cold - turn up the aircon, or heater.
Why do you need to know what the temp is ?
Hmm.

Are you saying that you have no thermometer inside your home?

So are you saying that when you feel cold you turn the Furnace ON and when you feel hot you turn it OFF?

In the summer months when you feel hot you turn ON the Air Condidtioner, and then OFF when you feel Cold.

Very interesting.

As for me, I do stick a meat thermoter on my top windshield top vent, cause I choose to know the temp coming out of the vents (cause I want to) and in the Cigarette lighter socket, I plug in a device displays not only the Inside Temperature of my car but also the actually reading of the 12 Volt Battery, but it is lit up and I can see the values when it is dark.

Yep, I love to live in the 21st Century. You know, in the Information Age.

"Cause I choose to want to know"20240526_165308.jpg20240526_165326.jpg
 
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Not at all.

This thread is about a PHEV that operates as a Hydrid, since Mitsubishi decided to force this Generation of Outlander PHEV to force the ICE to operate so as to use up old fuel until new fuel is added.

In the 2018-2022 this was not the case. In those years the ICE would be forced to take presidence only if the Drive Battery was depleted, Outside Temp was below a certain value, at times, when the HVAC was used and when the driver requested more power than the EV Motors could supply.

i have owned the previous generations, the 2018 with a 12 kWh Battery, the 2022 with 13.8kWh drive battery and the age of the fuel was never a parameter that required the exclusively running of the ICE so as to consume the old fuel

If I wanted an ICE vehicle I would have purchased one.

I upgraded to the 20kWh PHEV for allowing me the luxury of driving 85 to 90 kms per charge on EV Mode and the ability to use ICE when my battery was depleted.

What I did not expect was a PHEV to stop operating on EV Mode because the fuel was old. This was new to me and quite frankly a shock that some Engineer at Mitsubishi arbitrarily decided that every 90 days, the PHEV must operate as an ICE vehicleso as to Deplete the old fuel.

Many experts in field have declared that fuel can be is usable up to 1 year, so what gives with the Engineers at Mitsubishi????

Furthermore, if the tank on a 2024 PHEV has a Capacity of 56 liters, and we are forced to add at least 20 liters in order Stop running the ICE so we can start running in EV Mode again, it would mean that we can burn off 20 liters of old fuel, add 20 liters of "new" fuel to let the PHEV operate as intended in EV mode again.

But wait, ..... by adding 20 liters of "new" fuel to the remaining 36 liters of "old" fuel in the tank, does this fuel not get mixed to become dirty old fuel, again. So why are we being forced to deplete the old fuel again?

Makes absolute no sense me and quite frankly, quite idiotic, in my opinion.

So to summarize, I prefer to buy a PHEV over a full EV, because where I live we do not have a very good charging infrastructure and I did not want to buy an ICE.

I bought a PHEV that would allow me to drive in EV Mode like the previous generations of Outlander and 99% of other PHEVs on the Market and to not be forced to refuel with at least 20 liters so the car has "new fuel" to be able to run in EV Mode.

I hope that I have made myself clearer, as this thread was intended to bring to light a situation that was new and quite different to the overall operation of previous Outlander PHEV Generations.


To close this, I would like to add that as of 1 hr ago, I am back to being able to drive in EV Mode, again and now have 1/2 tank of gasoline in the tank.

I have a 2018 and we almost never put fuel in it. Maybe twice a year, MAYBE 3 times. In owning the car for 4 years I can only remember 1 or 2 times the car has asked me to put fuel in it due to the age of the fuel. Sometimes we go 1/2 a year before we need to put more in (because we periodically drive further outside of EV range). But typically we do short drives within EV Range and charge at home using L2. So almost never use the engine. (It is used in winter a bit more due to temperature/defrosting). And yes, our next car will be a full EV. Actually we already have one, a Tesla Model Y and it's great. When it comes time to retire the Outlander PHEV we will get a full EV. Mitsubishi should just bring out a full EV Outlander...
 
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I have a 2018 and we almost never put fuel in it. Maybe twice a year, MAYBE 3 times. In owning the car for 4 years I can only remember 1 or 2 times the car has asked me to put fuel in it due to the age of the fuel. Sometimes we go 1/2 a year before we need to put more in (because we periodically drive further outside of EV range). But typically we do short drives within EV Range and charge at home using L2. So almost never use the engine. (It is used in winter a bit more due to temperature/defrosting). And yes, our next car will be a full EV. Actually we already have one, a Tesla Model Y and it's great. When it comes time to retire the Outlander PHEV we will get a full EV. Mitsubishi should just bring out a full EV Outlander...
I think it is important to remember that manufacturing a BEV has a much larger emissions footprint with its much larger batteries. If you never or almost never actually need those batteries replacing a PHEV with a BEV is adding to the problem of climate change.
 
I think it is important to remember that manufacturing a BEV has a much larger emissions footprint with its much larger batteries. If you never or almost never actually need those batteries replacing a PHEV with a BEV is adding to the problem of climate change.

That is correct, but there is a tipping point after x number of years. It depends on the manufacturing and the energy production locally and other factors. In the long run the BEV is better for the environment. There are lots of articles on this, but here is one example:

https://about.bnef.com/blog/no-doubt-about-it-evs-really-are-cleaner-than-gas-cars/

Also the batteries can be recycled when they reach their end-of-life.
 
"Are you saying that you have no thermometer inside your home?"

That's right, we have a thermostat that we turn up if we feel cold, turn down if we feel hot.

Same as the climate control on the car.
 
"Are you saying that you have no thermometer inside your home?"

That's right, we have a thermostat that we turn up if we feel cold, turn down if we feel hot.

Same as the climate control on the car.
Exactly. 20th century technology, possibly even late 19th. It works, why do anything manually?
 
My home thermostat shows me the set temperature and the actual temperature. Same in the plane I fly. So why do car manufacturers think we don't need to know the actual temperature in the vehicle? I also miss the old days when I could just open a side vent that let air come directly in the car. Didn't need to start up any HVAC to keep cool air blowing on my face.:rolleyes:
 
That is correct, but there is a tipping point after x number of years. It depends on the manufacturing and the energy production locally and other factors. In the long run the BEV is better for the environment. There are lots of articles on this, but here is one example:

https://about.bnef.com/blog/no-doubt-about-it-evs-really-are-cleaner-than-gas-cars/

Also the batteries can be recycled when they reach their end-of-life.
Like most of these analysis they are modeling assumptions about how a vehicle is used, the sources of electricity and the alternatives that work to the advantage of the BEV. If one uses a PHEV almost entirely in electric mode they have zero applicability. There appears to be little doubt that a BEV has lower lifecycle emissions than a new ICE vehicle in some circumstances. There is virtually no evidence that it has lower emissions than a PHEV used in electric mode.
 
Yup, the temp on the dash display is the exterior temp. I don't know where the sensor(s) is, but I find that they are pretty accurate. In the old days one could get a little, coin sized temp display which could be stuck on the dash to show the interior temp, but I've not seen one for years ... and I would like one.
The exterior temp sensor is in front grille driver side lower part of the grille.
Interior is next to start button behind few grilled vent slots.

I tried to fool both in order to stop the engine before installing my kill switch.
 
Like most of these analysis they are modeling assumptions about how a vehicle is used, the sources of electricity and the alternatives that work to the advantage of the BEV. If one uses a PHEV almost entirely in electric mode they have zero applicability. There appears to be little doubt that a BEV has lower lifecycle emissions than a new ICE vehicle in some circumstances. There is virtually no evidence that it has lower emissions than a PHEV used in electric mode.

Yes as you stated it would depend on how the PHEV was driven (EV Mode, lots of long distance gas engine, etc). I can tell you though that with oil changes every 5 months or 8000 km there is no way it is better for the environment than my Tesla which requires zero oil changes. And oil changes are required irrespective of driving mode on the PHEV. (5 months or 8000km is the oil change interval in Canada).

Anyway, I didn't buy either my PHEV or my BEV for the environment. That is just a nice bonus to me. I bought them for the driving experience, technology, and cost savings over the long run, as I intend to keep both vehicles a long time. I'm 5 years into my PHEV and 3.5 into the Tesla. I would like to keep both vehicles as long as possible/practical to maximize the savings, as that is really the only way to come out ahead since both of these vehicles are way more expensive out-the-door than ICE counterparts. With the Tesla the app estimates I am saving approximately $2500 per year on fuel costs vs. an equivalent gas vehicle. I don't have the stats for the PHEV but it would also be good since we drive mostly within the EV range in EV mode. I only fill up 2-3 times per year. Electricity rates where I am are about 11 cents (CDN) per kwh. flat rate.
 
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Yes as you stated it would depend on how the PHEV was driven (EV Mode, lots of long distance gas engine, etc). I can tell you though that with oil changes every 5 months or 8000 km there is no way it is better for the environment than my Tesla which requires zero oil changes. And oil changes are required irrespective of driving mode on the PHEV. (5 months or 8000km is the oil change interval in Canada).

Anyway, I didn't buy either my PHEV or my BEV for the environment. That is just a nice bonus to me. I bought them for the driving experience, technology, and cost savings over the long run, as I intend to keep both vehicles a long time. I'm 5 years into my PHEV and 3.5 into the Tesla. I would like to keep both vehicles as long as possible/practical to maximize the savings, as that is really the only way to come out ahead since both of these vehicles are way more expensive out-the-door than ICE counterparts. With the Tesla the app estimates I am saving approximately $2500 per year on fuel costs vs. an equivalent gas vehicle. I don't have the stats for the PHEV but it would also be good since we drive mostly within the EV range in EV mode. I only fill up 2-3 times per year. Electricity rates where I am are about 11 cents (CDN) per kwh. flat rate.
I doubt that five quarts of oil is worse for the environment than the production of 10 times the batteries. Particularly since it is recycled. I understand that people buy electric cars for lots of reasons not having to to with the environment. But I think a lot of those people believe there is an environmental bonus even when there really isn't.
 
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