2023 vs. 2017-2022 Outlander PHEV suspension lift

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fossilandmineral

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May 9, 2023
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Hi! I'm currently researching the Outlander PHEV platform for errands and occasionally other tasks (light-duty trailering, soft-road camping) and noticed the earlier threads about people trying to lift the third generation model years (2022, 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017).

Notably with the third generation, there's been issues with sway bar end links breaking ( https://www.myoutlanderphev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=56667#p56667 , https://www.myoutlanderphev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5525 )

But if the 2023- fourth generation is built around the Nissan Rogue platform, could one just use the readylift kit on the 2023 Outlander PHEV?
 
I contacted readylift, they haven't confirmed fitment on the 2023 outlander phev yet, but hoping they do since it seems theoretically possible if the suspension bits are similar.
 
Hey, how was the lift? Did you go through with it, and if so, how does it look now?

At the time I was just considering the Outlander PHEV as possible vehicle purchase - particularly for use as a mild off-road camper after seeing images of the E - POP camper sold in Japan. I ended up continuing with a different vehicle project instead.
 
Cheapest 'Lift' is step up the tyre size to 40mm diameter over standard size, roughly 19 mm lift depending on tyre pressures. This corrects the Odometer ~6% under speed error to within 1km/hour at 110km, smooths and quietens the ride on all surfaces. Current tyre is Continental Sport Contact 235/60 18 running at 40psi all round. I tow a caravan and trailer without stability issue and have not had a steering lock clearance issue even on 'softroad' conditions. These tyres in addition to handling really well in wet and dry conditions also have a gel layer under the tread so with small punctures such as screws and nails they 'self repair'. (great for a 'no-spare' setup) They also wear well. I have just completed a front to back rotation after 40,000km and they are about 1/2 worn. My outlander tends to slightly round the outer edge off the front tyres (mostly my driving style) otherwise they wear evenly.
 
I will be changing from the recommended tyre size of 225 55 R18 to 225 60 R18, I guess that would provide a little lift.
 
Cheapest 'Lift' is step up the tyre size to 40mm diameter over standard size, roughly 19 mm lift depending on tyre pressures. This corrects the Odometer ~6% under speed error to within 1km/hour at 110km, smooths and quietens the ride on all surfaces. Current tyre is Continental Sport Contact 235/60 18 running at 40psi all round. I tow a caravan and trailer without stability issue and have not had a steering lock clearance issue even on 'softroad' conditions. These tyres in addition to handling really well in wet and dry conditions also have a gel layer under the tread so with small punctures such as screws and nails they 'self repair'. (great for a 'no-spare' setup) They also wear well. I have just completed a front to back rotation after 40,000km and they are about 1/2 worn. My outlander tends to slightly round the outer edge off the front tyres (mostly my driving style) otherwise they wear evenly.
Hey Mike, thanks for your post, that does sound like good info! I use my Outlander Aspire 2023 PHEV for a lot of camping in my car, including driving on some unpaved roads / light offroading to get to some music festival venues, and I’m always paranoid of the ground clearance being too low or that I’ll get a tyre puncture without a spare tyre while I’m in the middle of nowhere and have no phone signal, which is the situation at most festivals 😅 So I’ll definitely consider your tyre upgrade suggestion, if no-one finds a suspension lift option soon.
What do you mean about correcting the odometer 6%? Are you saying that the stock Outlander has incorrect odometer?
 
Continental Sport Contact

Hey Mike, thanks for your post, that does sound like good info! I use my Outlander Aspire 2023 PHEV for a lot of camping in my car, including driving on some unpaved roads / light offroading to get to some music festival venues, and I’m always paranoid of the ground clearance being too low or that I’ll get a tyre puncture without a spare tyre while I’m in the middle of nowhere and have no phone signal, which is the situation at most festivals 😅 So I’ll definitely consider your tyre upgrade suggestion, if no-one finds a suspension lift option soon.
What do you mean about correcting the odometer 6%? Are you saying that the stock Outlander has incorrect odometer?
Odometer underneath. Most do.
 
All modern cars (probably everything else too) have inaccurate speedometers.

The rules state they
1. must not indicate less than actual.
2. may indicate as much as 10% over actual
3. can indicate as much as 4km/h in addition to the above.

Legend has it that the car companies forced this on governments so they would not be sued in class actions for hoards of speeding tickets they uses didn't expect. Seems really odd because I've had a 2000/01 Holden Berlina wagon and a 2005 Holden Adventra (4WD version of the wagon) both of which had very accurate speedos. So it can be done.

So yeah 6% is probably about the best you are going to get and I think mine is about 8% error over actual speed. I sometimes set cruise at 110 so I'm just over 100km/h (on most NZ highway/motorways) not enough to get the cops attention.

Don't forget, the difference between new and wornout tyres is about 2%
 
I run a GPS navigator (currently Waze) that displays actual speed. I've used this tool in a mix of vehicles from hire cars to the eight work cars I've driven over the last 15 years. None of them are less than 4% and most are around 6% under speed. The translation is that at 100km per hour you are only travelling around 94km/hour. The other likely hood is that you are paying for your 15,000km service 900km too soon.
 
I think this is our only option in Oz as anything else appears to be illegal. Any pushback from the tyre fitters?
Tyre guy just shrugs his shoulders and takes my money :)
The Outlander model is 2021 GSR with Bilstein suspension standard.
The guards are also all metal without a plastic trim surrounding the wheel arch.
There may be critical dimension variations in other models.
 

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I run a GPS navigator (currently Waze) that displays actual speed. I've used this tool in a mix of vehicles from hire cars to the eight work cars I've driven over the last 15 years. None of them are less than 4% and most are around 6% under speed. The translation is that at 100km per hour you are only travelling around 94km/hour. The other likely hood is that you are paying for your 15,000km service 900km too soon.
I was told by a deal (so it must be true :) ) that the odometer is accurate +/1% and the speedometer was fast by 5% by law.
 
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