ICE on in 2023

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mellobob

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 11, 2018
Messages
283
Location
British Columbia, Canada
I have a '23 GT Canadian and notice that very often driving about in B3 with the temp around 0-10 C (warmest it's been so far) that according to the usage display the ICE is on, but not connected to the front wheels or the battery. I assume it running the heat pump? However, if I I try to go to EV at this point it refuses with a "can't do this message". Changing the mode to D turns the ICE off and permits EV mode.

This make any sense?
 
I don't like it. With the old PHEV I could paddle as much as I wanted and the ICE would not turn on. As soon as you change B modes in the new one it will start the ICE and run it through its timer to make sure it has warmed up. Only way to stop that timer is to turn the car off and on again. So now I don't touch the paddle shifters any more to keep it in EV mode.

Nothing to do with the heat pump. It will run anytime as long as OAT is above -15ºC.
 
Ahh, not about the heat ... good to know. And, good to know that it's not just my perception being screwed up either.

Also, I've noticed that hitting one-pedal-mode turns on the engine as well. Oh well ...

I wonder what the point of all this is ... just to keep the engine warm doesn't seem to make a lot of sense to me.
 
Since they decided to use the ICE as an "engine brake" to keep the same deceleration rates for the different B settings. They need to keep it warm to prevent unnecessary engine wear. You will notice that if your battery is below around 60% charge then it will stay in EV mode as the battery will absorb the full regen amounts.
If you bring up the EV power on the centre display you can see what the different B settings provide for regen:
B5 = 32 kW regen
B4 = 24 kW
B3 = 20 kW
B2 = 12 kW
B1= 4 kW
When brakes are applied you get full deflection to indicate 40 kW.
 
mellobob said:
This is interesting. Is the actual amount of fuel used to keep the engine warm known? Or is the fact that we have a warm engine a non-issue?

I interpret the wording in the manual to be near zero fuel is being consumed in this instance:

"If the shift lever position “B” (Regenerative Brake) is selected when the drive battery is near full charge, or when it becomes hot or cold, the engine is driven by the generator to consume regenerative power and support regenerative braking. At this time, the EV priority mode is canceled. When the shift lever position is switched to “D” (Drive), the engine will stop and the EV priority mode can be selected again." (emphasis added)

My guess is at most idle level fuel is being used and zero fuel when regen braking is actively occuring. And if you are in the habit of driving almost exclusively on drive battery, the system is designed to eventually turn the engine on to consume fuel before it gets too old and really harms the engine.

This is a PHEV, so we should temper our expectations on zero or near-zero fuel consumption. While its fun to try and squeeze out as much drive battery as we can, the reality is the ICE and fuel should be used periodically to ensure those mechanical systems are operating well.
 
Yes. Very important to heat up the engine oil every now and then to prevent condensation from building up in the oil. I believe the Chevrolet Volt could suffer from milky engine oil if the owner never let the engine warm up enough.
 
Good question on whether when the ICE is shown as being turned on keeps the engine warm. The way I read the manual in anything above B2 when the drive battery has lots of charge, the ICE is driven by the generator, so the display shows the ICE is on. It may not be turning revolutions to be kept warm, it is just on b/c the generator is on. Good question for a Mitsu engineer!
 
mellobob said:
This is interesting. Is the actual amount of fuel used to keep the engine warm known? Or is the fact that we have a warm engine a non-issue?

I tried to work it out by monitoring the mpg. It appears to be just a few cls.
 
mellobob said:
I have a '23 GT Canadian and notice that very often driving about in B3 with the temp around 0-10 C (warmest it's been so far) that according to the usage display the ICE is on, but not connected to the front wheels or the battery. I assume it running the heat pump? However, if I I try to go to EV at this point it refuses with a "can't do this message". Changing the mode to D turns the ICE off and permits EV mode.

This make any sense?

Hello - On the 23' cars outfitted with a new heat pump system the engine does not have to run to power the heat pump, the heat pump is powered directly by the high voltage battery.

If you avoid using higher than B2 and not use Innovative pedal, the engine should not run. However, during cold weather the engine may start at times to warm to 150-180 degrees then shut down again.

Mike
 
Slightly off-topic, does the new Outlander based on a similar platform as a Nissan PHEV still feature the GKN transmission system used in all the earlier models? It was one of the things that clinched my choice of car as being the Outlander PHEV - 2020 Dynamic in my case.
 
The new 2023 Outlanderhas a very similar drivetrain to the earlier models in 2014. Still the 4B12 ICE, although with a modified cylinder head.

The Traction battery is all new, as are the connectors.
 
DibbyDibbyDJ said:
The new 2023 Outlanderhas a very similar drivetrain to the earlier models in 2014. Still the 4B12 ICE, although with a modified cylinder head.

The Traction battery is all new, as are the connectors.

Thank you, I had feared that it might be emasculated by compromise.
 
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