Outlander Phev In-Depth Observations - Mike Mas

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While I touched base on cold weather driving in my article, I've witnessed lately anytime outside temperatures are in the 20's, the engine self-starts to protect the traction battery. At higher temps above 32F, I generally have to turn on the defroster to start the engine.

Don't forget to select "Keep or Hold" mode in freezing weather so it starts the gas engine. This saves your traction battery from high discharge and possible Plating which causes permanent damage to the cells. This allows the engine to provide most of the power needed to drive the car protecting the battery from high discharge and damage.

Ride - Safe - Mike

Ha, to start the gas engine intentionally... most people struggle to keep the engine off in mid 40F even.

BTW I am disabling the engine on short trips during the winter, third year already and my battery health is better than similar vehicles. (84% 2018 60k)
 
Ha, to start the gas engine intentionally... most people struggle to keep the engine off in mid 40F even.

BTW I am disabling the engine on short trips during the winter, third year already and my battery health is better than similar vehicles. (84% 2018 60k)
I always tried to minimise the use of the battery - it made little difference to the running cost of the car, but was a big maintenance bill waiting down the road - and I wanted to ensure it would be somebody else's problem, not mine!

Martin
 
Since we are talking about minimizing battery usage in winter, I am wondering if preconditioning the vehicle in cold winter would damage the battery. I noticed the preconditioning in my 2023 outlander PHEV doesn't use engine at all. Instead, it uses battery to warm up the car, plus some electricity from wall from Level 1 120V charger.
 
Since we are talking about minimizing battery usage in winter, I am wondering if preconditioning the vehicle in cold winter would damage the battery. I noticed the preconditioning in my 2023 outlander PHEV doesn't use engine at all. Instead, it uses battery to warm up the car, plus some electricity from wall from Level 1 120V charger.
If one is going to use the vehicle in the winter at all then preconditioning with its low power draw will only help the battery to activate it a bit and precondition the battery as well.

I am minimizing full charges and discharges though, since I can with my short commute.
 
I always tried to minimise the use of the battery - it made little difference to the running cost of the car, but was a big maintenance bill waiting down the road - and I wanted to ensure it would be somebody else's problem, not mine!

Martin
Can you share your routine in minimizing battery usage?
 
If one is going to use the vehicle in the winter at all then preconditioning with its low power draw will only help the battery to activate it a bit and precondition the battery as well.

I am minimizing full charges and discharges though, since I can with my short commute.
I was thinking if I should skip preconditioning and just start vehicle, then vehicle will automatically start ICE in such cold temperature. Not sure which way is better for battery health.
 
Can you share your routine in minimizing battery usage?
Drive on save until the battery gets down to around 30% then drive on charge till it gets up to about 60% - repeat until I arrive at my destination.

Martin
 
Hello Outlander Owners - I just completed an In-Depth Article on the Mitsubishi Outlander Phev. This article provides a detailed look at how the new Outlander Heat Pump operates and how it differs from other hybrids and EV’s. I’ll cover HV battery heating and cooling. How to prevent lithium battery “Plating” a permanent damage which occur to lithium batteries during cold weather use. I’ll compare how the Outlander fairs against the Hybrids like the Toyota Rav4. Talk about the dangers of owners switching their AGM 12 volt battery to lithium. Discuss the fact the new Outlander might not be the best plug-in Hybrid for colder regions and how Mitsubishi left out a vital battery component which could leave you and your family stranded in frigid weather. I’ll talk about Innovative Pedal and B-3 / B-5 High Regen, how they work and why they sometimes start the gas engine. PHEV Travel suggestions for added safety and more economy. Finally, introduce “Volting” a Method of Engine / Motor / Cycling which can reduce your engine run time up to 40% on trips using less fuel.

Note: Because of graphics used, I authored the story using QuarkXpress and placed it on my non sponsored /Ad-Free web site. Please click on the link below - Enjoy Mike

Outlander Phev In Depth Observations - Mike Mas

http://rotory.com/PHEV/outlander/
phevopen.jpeg
Mike,
Thanks for your article. It was very informative to a new Outlander 2023 PHEV owner.

Jim
 
Mike @LowOnCash I should also have agreed that this was a hugely helpful thread and your article is something that every potential or newb owner should digest. Expert opinion is always valuable.

I won't ever have the problems with extreme cold that NA owners have, but that's not the only factor impacting on ownership.

Thank you!
 
Drive on save until the battery gets down to around 30% then drive on charge till it gets up to about 60% - repeat until I arrive at my destination.

Martin
On Save the battery don't go down, just oscillate around the point at which you activate it. Probably you meant Normal instead of Save.
Charging in cold is the actual problem for the battery health but I get it, there is no other way to operate the vehicle. It will always use the battery. It is out of user control.

If by minimizing the battery usage you mean using it in the mid level between 30% and 60% I am doing similar. Not charging it over 80% if possible, don't running it down and not keeping if fully charged (when I need the full charge) for long period of time.
 
On Save the battery don't go down, just oscillate around the point at which you activate it. Probably you meant Normal instead of Save.
....
No, I mean Save - the charge level still drifts down over time because the hysteresis loop on the PHEV charge level is quite wide. You start the car and hit Save, then drive off - almost always, the charge level will be lower when you turn the car off and that becomes the new high point of the loop the next time save is selected. We move around a lot and typically spend three or four days per week away from home with no opportunity to charge the car, so we have to manage battery levels carefully...

Martin
 
No, I mean Save - the charge level still drifts down over time because the hysteresis loop on the PHEV charge level is quite wide. You start the car and hit Save, then drive off - almost always, the charge level will be lower when you turn the car off and that becomes the new high point of the loop the next time save is selected. We move around a lot and typically spend three or four days per week away from home with no opportunity to charge the car, so we have to manage battery levels carefully...

Martin
Ok multiple runs without grid charging between, I got it.
 
Ok multiple runs without grid charging between, I got it.
A typical pattern of use would be to leave home with a fully charged battery and spend three or four days at our boat, using the car for local trips without the opportunity to recharge. Running the car on Save over that period would leave the battery flat before we got home again.

Martin
 
Hello all - definitely a cold spell we're having - A tip to help keep the HV battery a bit warmer is, I use a 800 watt Xtreme Marine & RV heater. These coast guard heaters are manufactured by www.xtremeheaters.com This heater is very safe and constructed 100% of 6061 T6 aluminum so there is no chance of fire. I have been using this heater for years in all my RV lithium installations.

By positioning the heater along side the car, the fan blows heated air to the undercarriage where it rises to maintain or warm battery temperature. Since the battery case is aluminum it readily accepts heat (or cold). I position it right by the drivers door as a reminder to move it.

While its certainly not a HV battery heater, it will help to at least maintain temperature of the Outlander battery. On warmer days in the 30-40's F, I actually witnessed the battery on my EV6 increase 3-4 degrees overnight.

Stay Safe - Mike

BATT HEAT.jpg
 

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I had owned a 2018 PHEV from Jan 2018 to Sep 2021 and currently a 2022 from Sep 2021.

I have been going to Mexico for 30 days since 2022 from Jan to Feb.

I plug in my charging cable 120vac to full, unplug it when I leave and when I return in mid Feb, although the the interior or the car is very cold and the seats rock hard, the car start with no issue.

My charge range usually drops from full to 75% full. I observe ice accumulation on tge ground (along outside of the car.

This to me, is an indication that my PHEV Automatically keeps the Drive Battery warm, as it is intended to do.

We just had a spell of -23 to -30'C and I can report that I had no trouble starting and driving my PPHEV. Only complaint I have is that the ICE never turned off even though my Battery was charged to 75%.

During 1 week of driving in city, I drove 130 kms, used 2/3 of a tank of gasoline, and trip meter indicates 13% driven on Electricity.


Battery range was zero when I plugged in last night.


Although I wish my Battery was bigger than 13.8kWh a day that I could gorce the var to dri e in EV mode at lower Temps, the car is smart enough to prevent the Drive Battery to stay warm.

No external heater required on the 2018 or 2022 PHEV.

NOot sure about the 23 or 24.
 
I had owned a 2018 PHEV from Jan 2018 to Sep 2021 and currently a 2022 from Sep 2021.

I have been going to Mexico for 30 days since 2022 from Jan to Feb.

I plug in my charging cable 120vac to full, unplug it when I leave and when I return in mid Feb, although the the interior or the car is very cold and the seats rock hard, the car start with no issue.

My charge range usually drops from full to 75% full. I observe ice accumulation on tge ground (along outside of the car.

This to me, is an indication that my PHEV Automatically keeps the Drive Battery warm, as it is intended to do.

We just had a spell of -23 to -30'C and I can report that I had no trouble starting and driving my PPHEV. Only complaint I have is that the ICE never turned off even though my Battery was charged to 75%.

During 1 week of driving in city, I drove 130 kms, used 2/3 of a tank of gasoline, and trip meter indicates 13% driven on Electricity.


Battery range was zero when I plugged in last night.


Although I wish my Battery was bigger than 13.8kWh a day that I could gorce the var to dri e in EV mode at lower Temps, the car is smart enough to prevent the Drive Battery to stay warm.

No external heater required on the 2018 or 2022 PHEV.

NOot sure about the 23 or 24.
I was doing some research into the Outlander. I see that in the 2018 Outlander’s owner’s manual that on page 2-11 it says that the “BATTERY TOO COLD” may be displayed on the multi information display at temperatures of -30°C or colder. Could it be that when you returned from Mexico in previous years and in the recent cold spell of -23 to -30°C that the traction battery was not cold enough to trigger the message? Do you perhaps have an unheated garage that does not get as cold as the outdoor temperature?
 
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